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    Is There A Way To See How Much Someone Is Paying For PPC


    Is There A Way To See How Much Someone Is Paying For PPC on a keyword, and specifically for the results at the top.
    Last edited by seogod1505; Sep 23rd, 2010 at 01:01 PM.
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    semrush.com gives you an estimate of their total budget, but the only real way would be to see their stats.
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    Sorry, I didnít make myself clear. Iíll start from the beginning.

    About 3 months ago I started a site that is very specific to my niche.

    The targeted keywords to my niche only produces 6000 searches a month according to Googleís keyword tool for exact match for local search.

    The title for my homepage was made for keywords (my mistake) and does not look attractive for potential customers.

    I am ranking in the top 5 positions for 15 keywords, and 5 of them are at number 1 position.

    So there are 6000 impressions for my site a month, but Iím only getting about 100 views to my site in a month.

    There is a reason why the other 5900 searchers are not clicking on my site.

    I donít want to change my title now as that will mess up my rankings, so I have decided to try PPC.

    I have used PPC on another website, but that was managed by a PPC agency, so I am not familiar with it.

    I would hire someone to do my PPC, but I want to make sure my product converts into a sale first.

    I have started a new PPC campaign to do some testing with. I have a £75.00 coupon that was sent to my home.

    Now I have added 1 keyword which was automatically set to £3.39 max CPC, so Iím assuming the current number 1 position pays £3.38 per click, but I would like a way of knowing how much number 2 and 3 position pay per click.

    I could still spend £3.39 per click but I would need a conversion of 1 sale in 50 clicks to be worthwhile to me.
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    The most probably cause for the other 5900 searchers not viewing your site is that they don't really exist...

    Google's keyword tool is not accurate in the slightest. It can only be used for relative measures, not for any numbers.

    I've got several sites ranked #1 for several terms. Not one of them receives even 25% of what Google's keyword tool suggests.

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    • seogod1505 agrees : Thanks
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    Originally Posted by jsteele823
    The most probably cause for the other 5900 searchers not viewing your site is that they don't really exist...

    Google's keyword tool is not accurate in the slightest. It can only be used for relative measures, not for any numbers.

    I've got several sites ranked #1 for several terms. Not one of them receives even 25% of what Google's keyword tool suggests.
    Would you say that GWT is accurate?
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    I don't think that knowing how much the top site in the sponsored listings is paying per click would help you with anything.

    They could be paying less than you and yet gain a higher rank in the listings.

    Quality score of your campaign has a direct relation to your CPC rates and sponsored ranks.

    Josh is spot on on the missing traffic - Google adwords keyword tool shows the number of impressions generated in Google, not the number of clicks.

    And moreover, those numbers don't indicate the searches made by potential customers, they could be made by website owners, SEOs, online researchers and a small percentage of that are your potential customers.

    I had a site ranked # 1 for a term that Google estimated a search volume of 96000/ month and the traffic I got from that term in a month was between 300 - 750.

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    • EGOL agrees : yes! :P

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    So many things here...

    First, I have to say that the keyword tool is accurate in it's impression numbers. I've checked many of them against actual Adwords data. When a campaign has 100% impression share or close, the numbers always matched.

    One thing is that the numbers will be different for broad, phrase and exact matches. I suggest not to look at the broad matches.

    Unfortunately as seo_pro said, there will be a certain percentage of researchers and other site owners using the keywords way too often to "check my ranking" which skews the results. This percentage will vary from niche to niche but I estimate could be as high as 15% in some cases.

    Second, it doesn't mean that you showed for all 6000 searches or even if there was 6000 searches. You just know what it was the previous full month of data the tool has.

    Third, people seem to assume that being first or close to it will give them traffic. A lot even throw around a 42% click rate figure for first place. Well, that figure is four years old and how it was calculated was flawed in my opinion. I know, I have the data and looked at it. Quite interesting when you dig deeper and remove the fluff.

    Four, the above point assumes every one is the same. They're not. Lots of things will affect your organic click rate, the main one being what your listing says. It is your ad after all. Just as I can increase your PPC ad's click rate, sometimes quite dramatically, I can do as well for your organic listing, since I know most are poor. So I assume this is your main problem: a unattractive listing.

    You also don't have data from organics. How many times each keyword was shown and the average position? You just don't know. An overall 1.7% click rate (100/6000, this second number assumed), depending on what your listing says and the position may be normal for this niche.

    Now, the keyword tool prices are estimates. Things change all the time. Note it's the estimate to get the top three positions. It doesn't tell you for each position, which is what your question is. Also, it has to assume a few things. One is that your costs depend on your quality. Since it doesn't know, it takes a middle of the road approach and current conditions to give you that estimate. However, with good quality comes better rewards. I've achieved actual costs of half and even a third of the estimate for the top positions, echoing what seo_pro said.
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    Originally Posted by seogod1505

    I donít want to change my title now as that will mess up my rankings, so I have decided to try PPC.
    See this post re: changing page title

    http://forums.seochat.com/showthread.php?p=878940#post878940
    Frankly, I wonder who Frank is and why he has his own adverb.
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  17. rod@missionop.com
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    Originally Posted by Lucid Marketing
    First, I have to say that the keyword tool is accurate in it's impression numbers. I've checked many of them against actual Adwords data. When a campaign has 100% impression share or close, the numbers always matched.
    Of course... the disconnect is "no one is really interest in impressions" and Google tools won't provide click data.

    As such, if you are merely interested in how many times a page loads and reloads... you got the best, most accurate tool on the planet.

    If you are interested in clicks... you are using the wrong "most inaccurate tool on the same planet".
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    pro_seo
    I don't think that knowing how much the top site in the sponsored listings is paying per click would help you with anything.

    They could be paying less than you and yet gain a higher rank in the listings.

    Quality score of your campaign has a direct relation to your CPC rates and sponsored ranks.
    Thanks, i just assumed that whoever paid the most would be included in the top 3 results, so i will look into the quality factors aswell.


    Lucid Marketing
    Third, people seem to assume that being first or close to it will give them traffic. A lot even throw around a 42% click rate figure for first place. Well, that figure is four years old and how it was calculated was flawed in my opinion. I know, I have the data and looked at it. Quite interesting when you dig deeper and remove the fluff.
    That 42% was revealed by AOL in 2006 which can only be an average right? that 42% does not include PPC, so what is that 42% based on? so what percentage does PPC get? If i should be getting 42% clicks, then my 1.7% should be converted into 42% whih means that only 250 clicks get made on the organic search, leaving 5750 clicks to the PPC ads. So, yes this method is flawed.


    JBacchi
    See this post re: changing page title

    http://forums.seochat.com/showthread.php?p=878940#post878940
    Thanks, i'm going to work on improving my title after reading this.


    fathom
    Of course... the disconnect is "no one is really interest in impressions" and Google tools won't provide click data.

    As such, if you are merely interested in how many times a page loads and reloads... you got the best, most accurate tool on the planet.

    If you are interested in clicks... you are using the wrong "most inaccurate tool on the same planet".
    Why would anybody need to know how many times a page loads or reloads? The simple fact is that i do not know of any tool that reveals click data from google.

    I'm using the most inaccurate tool? Why don't you share a good tool insted of saying that?

    What i can do is make an assumption that out of 6000 impressions 25% are not valid.



    Today i have started an adwords course that google provides, so i'm just going to breeze though it to get a better idea of things.

    Thanks everyone that has helped.
    Last edited by seogod1505; Sep 24th, 2010 at 07:05 PM.
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    You are misunderstanding the 42% figure.

    It's not 42% of people who click on any listing. It's the percentage of people who click on the first natural listing. It does not include PPC.

    Yes, it's an average across all searches. What AOL did was simply record searches on their system for a month and the clicks. The data even shows the search performed and all clicks on natural results and the domain of those clicks. Fascinating to see how and what people searched, at least back in 2006 on AOL. But if you remove the junk, that 42% is way off.

    For example, many people search on the domain for some weird reason. The percentage is actually quite high. I'd have to rerun the queries but I recall a figure over 20%, maybe 25%. Of course, the domain invariably shows first. Strangely, many don't even click it or any other listing. In fact, a large percentage of searches done don't get any clicks at all. When I removed this kind of search, the first position result was clicked only about 25% of the time.
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    Originally Posted by Lucid Marketing
    You are misunderstanding the 42% figure.

    It's not 42% of people who click on any listing. It's the percentage of people who click on the first natural listing. It does not include PPC.
    I have not misunderstood anything matey.

    This is what i wrote:

    That 42% was revealed by AOL in 2006 which can only be an average right? that 42% does not include PPC, so what is that 42% based on?
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    Originally Posted by seogod1505
    Why would anybody need to know how many times a page loads or reloads? The simple fact is that i do not know of any tool that reveals click data from google.
    Analytics does, all log file analyzers and even rudimentary tracking tools that are included with most hosting accounts.
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    I've rechecked the figures since it's been awhile. The 42% is the number of people who click on an organic result, not just the first one but any. Meaning 58% don't click on any result. 25% click on the first.

    Don't know what you mean by "what is that 42% based on". Seems simple: 42% of people conducting a search will click on a listing. And we are talking about organic, not PPC.
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    Originally Posted by Lucid Marketing
    I've rechecked the figures since it's been awhile. The 42% is the number of people who click on an organic result, not just the first one but any. Meaning 58% don't click on any result. 25% click on the first.

    Don't know what you mean by "what is that 42% based on". Seems simple: 42% of people conducting a search will click on a listing. And we are talking about organic, not PPC.
    Actually I think you are confused... "click data" is about clicks not non-click... so 100% of everyone recorded clicked on something... and an average 42.3% clicked on number 1.

    <edit>I had the data... looking but a pdf slide for now



    </edit>
    Last edited by fathom; Sep 25th, 2010 at 03:59 PM.
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