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    Post competitive vs non competitive keywords


    I've seen some discussion on here about competitive and non competitive keywords and I wanted to see if I could get some oppinions on this area..

    Do you personally go after non competitive keywords more often than competitive?

    about how many sites is your limit for a keyword before you would call it competitive.. (ex.. returned results in google)

    using the overture tools how many searches would you estimate to be a good amount per month?

    i realize this completely depends on your competition but I just wanted some rough numbers.. also.. i know many of you compare google results, keyword search numbers and the "keyword difficulty" checker to determine your possible success in a new market.. but what would you think a good ratio would be?
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    I look primarily at the cost of PPC for a keyword to determine its difficulty. If people are paying $1 per click, I consider that a pretty competitive word. >$5 is VERY competitive. <$.50, pretty easy... you get the idea. I'll also check the number of results, but I'd give that less weight. For example Google only shows about 3,000,000 results for "automobile insurance quote". That is a moderate number, but on Overture people are bidding over $6 for them term. With that kind of money at stake, you can bet it is a VERY competitive term.
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    Since you realize that it totally depends on your competition, you must be looking for terms worth going after.

    To give you some rough numbers: If Overture says 6000 searches/month for a certain term, in reality you may get 800 visitors/month if you are #1 in Google.

    'Competition' is a very subjective term. Terms that are competitive for you may not be competitive for me, and the other way around.

    Also look to see if the way you extract profit from your site is the same, less, or better than your comp. You could have a number one spot, but if all you do is feature Adsense then you are no match to a company who sells the actual product/service. They will have more profit, which leads to more investment into keeping their position high.
    Last edited by DanielK; Oct 13th, 2004 at 09:36 AM.
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    As you say you are after some rough numbers I will try and give you ball park figures, bit as you rightly assume it does greatly depend on industry (some are more prone to heavy spamming so the number of results isn't accurate).

    For an idea of a terms competitiveness I go mainly on wordtracker.com's KEI (Keyword Effectiveness Index) which is a good over all indication of competitiveness and atcualy gives you a scale for good - bad keywords. It does far more than this.

    I would then say that once a term has over 7 million results (non quoted - 3 word keyphrase) then it is quite competitive. Again though this depends on industry as some industried have fully embraced SEO where as others have not. The amount of backlinks (in total) can be a decent indicator as to how competitive a term is as well - by analysing the first few results.

    I would say that a nice amount of searches would be above 2000 and with effectively written titles and good decriptive text you can expect to see about 300 - 500 visitors per month.

    I hope this has answered your questions.
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    Get some idea about how difficult it is to rank on the first page for a query
    http://www.searchguild.com/cgi-bin/difficulty.pl
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    It makes more sense to go for less competitive keywords or phrases - as you target a more specific audience. A more targeted audience is more likely to be a buying one.

    Widgets might get a lot of searches, but if you target key phrases like metal widgets and plastic widgets or Widgets Edinburgh you get a buyer who knows what specific product they want or where they are looking for that product.

    Generic terms like widgets tend to get more browsers or window shoppers.

    IMHO
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    I guess what I was looking for were some rough numbers that I might be able to adapt into the tools i'm writing.. taking huge numbers of keywords and known searches.. using the various tools we have at our disposal.. such as the difficulty checker.. various keyword tools.. total google results.. coming up with a ratio or value that represents all of these numbers..

    my goal would be to analyze 1000s or 10,000s of phrases and slim down the list for terms that are promissing and might not be overly saturated.. i think this could be an effective strategy and useful for those times when you just cant come up with a good site idea but you have some time to work and want to try something new..
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    "I look primarily at the cost of PPC for a keyword to determine its difficulty. If people are paying $1 per click, I consider that a pretty competitive word. >$5 is VERY competitive. <$.50, pretty easy... you get the idea. I'll also check the number of results, but I'd give that less weight. For example Google only shows about 3,000,000 results for "automobile insurance quote". That is a moderate number, but on Overture people are bidding over $6 for them term. With that kind of money at stake, you can bet it is a VERY competitive term." - brandall
    That's exactly what I do.

    "It makes more sense to go for less competitive keywords or phrases - as you target a more specific audience. A more targeted audience is more likely to be a buying one. Widgets might get a lot of searches, but if you target key phrases like metal widgets and plastic widgets or Widgets Edinburgh you get a buyer who knows what specific product they want or where they are looking for that product. Generic terms like widgets tend to get more browsers or window shoppers." - mountainmad
    I've found this to be true for most of the sites I've been involved with.

    - Mike T.

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